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  Udayan Care’s Response to COVID 19 Crisis: Caring for Children and Youth without Parental Care Dr Kiran Modi We are seeing crisis unfolding itself at an unprecedented scale during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in India. The loss and risks to life is of a nature, unwitnessed in recent times, with not only right to health and right to life being compromised at various levels, but also the deepening woes, due to the deteriorating socio-economic situation and increasing stress and mental health concerns. While the first wave was sudden and took us by surprise, the disease was not so severe or virulent in nature and mortality was low. Children were largely spared, even though they had to go through psychological issues due to restrictions, schools closures and being confined to their homes largely. But the second wave has brought in more devastations. This wave of the pandemic has caused the surge in cases, with more children being symptomatically affected, who were relatively
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  Experiencing Covid and remembering to be Compassionate and Kind I woke up with the sound of bells at the temple and to the smell of camphor. 13th April was the first day of Navratra and I, being a devotee, was   dressed up to go to the temple for puja and havan, early in the morning. I remember feeling tired and uneasy before leaving for the temple but did not pay much attention to it. After returning from the temple when I took the temperature reading, it was 101 degrees. In shock, the first thought that flashed in my mind was, “Is it Covid?” Anxiety creeped in and I rushed to Kailash Hospital in Noida for an RT-PCR test immediately. Second wave of Covid-19 was at its peak and the hospital was overcrowded.   It took me two hours to get the test done.   After I returned back home, as a responsible individual I purposefully quarantined myself in a room. The test result came the next day and it was positive! I felt immensely guilty for no fault of mine, wondering if I had unintenti
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  My mother was born just after India attained independence from the British. She was one of 20 siblings in her family, an era when family planning which were medically approved and scientific were still unknown to India. For a while, her family was rich and they could afford a room for women who had periods. Wait! A room for periods? Yes, for those 4 days, women would be segregated and cannot come outside the room. While they enjoyed the break since it also meant a break from manual work for those 4 days, it was a practice equivalent to untouchability . Men would not see them as it was considered inauspicious. Fast forward 75 years, we still have millions who go through this practice in India. My mother suffered from Menorrhagia or severe bleeding for years which was an after effect of poor hygiene methods that existed in that era. But what shocks me is that till date a million cases per year are identified for this illness in India. It affects the heart and they are prone to cardiac
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  A Mother Of Thousands Daughters! Click here to Read Blog  Part 1 Click here to  Read Blog  Part 2
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 Standing strong against COVID-19 Values to an organization are like the conscience to an individual which guides one’s belief, thinking, behaviour and actions. Compassion – Inspire – Respect – Competence – Accountability acronymed as CIRCA are the core values at Udayan Care. These very values are reflected in our way of getting involved and work with our employees, donors and most importantly our beneficiaries and bring us closer to our vision of ' Making Young Lives Shine '. The recent times have been challenging for everyone across the globe. The multifaceted crisis which came along with the pandemic outbreak has outrageously impacted individuals, institutions, organizations, businesses commonly and differently all over the world. Loss of employment, the shutdown of industries, depleting economy, fear of losing lives etc. which continued to progress during these unprecedented times has affected people financially, psychologically, emotionally and physically. Under these circ
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  Deinstitutionalisation and the Best Interest of the Child: The Case of Rwanda and Lessons for South Asia What Is ‘Deinstitutionalisation’? In simple terms, DI is a move away from institutional care to more suitable forms of care for children, whether in family of origin or in alternative care. Much more complex in practice, what it entails is encapsulated in the Necessity and Suitability principles of the UN Guidelines. Although it is the latter that often steals the limelight in DI processes, preventing the need for alternative care—institutional care in particular—is as critical to render the DI process complete. The ‘Necessity Principle’, within the context of DI, denotes measures taken to prevent children from losing parental care and falling into the care of institutions, which is often the inevitable in countries where institutions may be the only form of alternative care available. The ‘Suitability Principle’ entails finding the care option that is the ‘most appropriate to eac
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Multiple Attachments of OSCs in Residential Care Attachment research has shown that favourable child–caregiver attachment patterns established early in life can contribute to a number of positive outcomes, including higher self-esteem, resilience, and positive perceptions of romantic relationships in adulthood (Cassidy et al., 2013; Laible et al., 2000). Bowlby and Ainsworth’s foundational attachment theory focuses on construction of these child–caregiver relationships over time, defining secure attachment as an emotional bond that stems from an innate drive and is nurtured by dependability and responsiveness (Flaherty & Sadler, 2011). Longitudinal studies find various stages in the development of attachment to single or multiple caregivers over time (Ainsworth, 1973; Schaffer & Emerson, 1964).  Schaffer and Emerson (1964) outlined four distinct phases, with the last two being discriminate attachment and multiple attachment; results indicated that from seven to eleven months of